Ivy Haldeman

Twice

Downs & Ross
96 Bowery, 2nd Floor
New York
Lower East Side
May 6th 2021 — Jun 19th 2021

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Ivy Haldeman’s strange and surreal point of view announces itself from the very first and most intimate piece of her solo show, “Twice,” at Downs & Ross: Hand, Sitting, Index Crossed Over Middle (2021), in which the knuckle-less, nailless fingers of a neon orange hand easily hold the impossible position described in the work’s title. What can only be termed “power suit paintings” continue the theme throughout this show: bodiless suits dance or cozy up, somehow throwing a knowing look at the viewer or else snapping to a beat, despite lack of face or hands or music.

Wrought with an animator’s impeccable linework and a combination of soothing pastels and desaturated neons, a number of these paintings depict women and hands, often producing enigmatic gestures. The women have faces like those on the sides of beauty parlors—expressionless, with squinty yet sultry eyes and giant, trident-like eyelashes, little noses, and full lips—except where their heads inexplicably bunch up at the top and burst into Kleenex-shaped sprouts. They are set against soft and ambiguous pale yellow backdrops full of swoops and curves; what could be a pillowy hip or a doughy shoulder in most paintings becomes, in Full Figure, Head Leans on Bun Edge, Leg Akimbo, Bottom Enfolded (2021), a full-fledged hot dog bun for a hot dog woman. An easy-to-miss hole in the gallery’s wall gives view to a sculptural take on the subject: a velveteen hotdog-woman hybrid, buns and sausage both made flesh.

Ivy Haldeman, Two Suits, Cuffs Crossed, Leaning on Elbows, Sitting with Arm Back (Smalt, Blue Horizontal), 2021. Acrylic on canvas, 67 × 60 inches.

  • Through
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  • Through
    May 29th

    Inspired by fractals, Renee Cox’s deity-like collages of Black figures constitute an Afrofuturist creation myth.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    An economical survey of Jonas Mekas, “The Camera Was Always Running” serves as a touching introduction to the Lithuanian filmmaker and champion of avant-garde cinema.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The work in Valentina Vaccarella’s “Bless this Life” rests on a simple irony: monogrammed, embroidered French bridal linens pulled taut across stretcher bars and besmirched by rough images of modern madams.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    Daniel Lie’s “Unnamed Entities” at the New Museum challenges the antiseptic aim of curation and conservation by imagining a different kind of organic art that needs to be nurtured rather than preserved.

  • Ongoing

    Dia’s recent acquisition of works by Charles Gaines forms the basis of this survey, which includes the artist’s first forays into mathematics-based grid drawings and other early experiments in medium and form.

  • Ongoing

    Day’s End, an elegiac memorial to and stubborn ghost of eras bygone, will also serve as silent witness to the inevitable changes to come.

  • Through
    Jan 2nd 2023

    The sonic encounters provoked by Camille Norment’s elaborate acoustic artworks serve as agents for social consciousness.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The words masterful and mastery assert themselves the instant one encounters the works in “My Body,” both for Nancy Grossman’s command of a wide range of skills and her active state of dominance, identity and selfhood.