Joe W. Speier

You Likey?

King's Leap
368 Broadway, #506 / #302
New York
Tribeca
Mar 26th 2021 — Apr 24th 2021

Find out more

In Joe W. Speier’s first exhibition at King’s Leap, craft-store materials and drawings found online converge in gestural and figurative paintings that blur the lines between the digital and the analog and complicate definitions of authorship and artistry. The eight new works take account of the push and pull between seemingly opposing elements. Beyond his vernacular material—ballpoint pen, acrylic, glitter, flocking, and metal microbeads feature in the exhibition—Speier instantiates a dialogue through text and imagery.

In Shamey Poo (2021) [pictured], for example, words such as “GUILTY,” “SHAME,” and “ALONE” are stitched across the canvas. Their beaded forms have the quality of desperate journal writing: one can imagine that the capitalized slashing forms are drawn by a frenzied hand, a visual effect which communicates volume and intensity. Beneath it all, a lone suited figure under an umbrella traverses the bottom corner of the painting, seemingly exiting the canvas. The word “HATE” is nearly obscured by the darkness of the figure’s suit. It’s not the painting’s only elision: Speier further intervenes into the surface with glittering teal paint that drips and smears across the canvas, effacing, in part, the phrase at the bottom of the painting that asks “HOW CAN INNOCENCE BE GUILTY.”

Joe W. Speier, Shamey Poo, 2021. Ballpoint pen, acrylic medium, glitter, and metal microbeads, 60 x 48 inches.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    A traveling exhibition of 69 oil paintings, watercolors and works on paper aims to chart Milton Avery’s trajectory and contextualize his work for a new generation.

  • Through
    May 29th

    Inspired by fractals, Renee Cox’s deity-like collages of Black figures constitute an Afrofuturist creation myth.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    An economical survey of Jonas Mekas, “The Camera Was Always Running” serves as a touching introduction to the Lithuanian filmmaker and champion of avant-garde cinema.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The work in Valentina Vaccarella’s “Bless this Life” rests on a simple irony: monogrammed, embroidered French bridal linens pulled taut across stretcher bars and besmirched by rough images of modern madams.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    Daniel Lie’s “Unnamed Entities” at the New Museum challenges the antiseptic aim of curation and conservation by imagining a different kind of organic art that needs to be nurtured rather than preserved.

  • Ongoing

    Dia’s recent acquisition of works by Charles Gaines forms the basis of this survey, which includes the artist’s first forays into mathematics-based grid drawings and other early experiments in medium and form.

  • Ongoing

    Day’s End, an elegiac memorial to and stubborn ghost of eras bygone, will also serve as silent witness to the inevitable changes to come.

  • Through
    Jan 2nd 2023

    The sonic encounters provoked by Camille Norment’s elaborate acoustic artworks serve as agents for social consciousness.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The words masterful and mastery assert themselves the instant one encounters the works in “My Body,” both for Nancy Grossman’s command of a wide range of skills and her active state of dominance, identity and selfhood.