Matt Connors

Body Forth

Canada
60 Lispenard Street
New York
Tribeca
Jan 27th — Mar 5th

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Color and composition are Matt Connors’s chief tools of the trade. In his new exhibition of abstract paintings at Canada, “Body Forth,” tweaking of largely just those two properties produces canvases dissimilar in size, palette, movement, density, and feeling. The show’s press release, which meditates on the 1971 film Minnie & Moskowitz, describes Connors’s “agonizing” process to decide which yellow to paint his studio trim, a hue that appears in some of his paintings here, along with his drawing formal inspiration from other sources, like the windows at Dia Beacon.

Connors’s palette also includes black, the hue that suggests the absence of color. In some paintings, such as Data & Recognition (2022), a graphite grid atop a ground of gentle creams and pastels quietly girds a large, black shape resembling a human silhouette. Frantic Comedown (2022) features thick black lines that resemble eye floaters, while in Deglove (2021), swaths of black tint hold the piece together.

A large, somewhat ambiguous piece of black furniture—part-bureau and part-bookshelf, mostly empty save for a small painting nestled in a door-sized aperture—takes center stage between two pillars, a nod to the Ryan Precido furniture-laden exhibition at Canada’s space next door. This points to another pair of influences or methods of work, less visible than color: book publishing and creative collaboration. An untitled Connors piece is on view in Precido’s concurrent exhibition, and a book by the two will be published to accompany the show. —Lisa Yin Zhang

Matt Connors, Data & Recognition, 2022. Acrylic and pencil on canvas, 60 × 51 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Canada Gallery.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    A traveling exhibition of 69 oil paintings, watercolors and works on paper aims to chart Milton Avery’s trajectory and contextualize his work for a new generation.

  • Through
    May 29th

    Inspired by fractals, Renee Cox’s deity-like collages of Black figures constitute an Afrofuturist creation myth.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    An economical survey of Jonas Mekas, “The Camera Was Always Running” serves as a touching introduction to the Lithuanian filmmaker and champion of avant-garde cinema.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The work in Valentina Vaccarella’s “Bless this Life” rests on a simple irony: monogrammed, embroidered French bridal linens pulled taut across stretcher bars and besmirched by rough images of modern madams.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    Daniel Lie’s “Unnamed Entities” at the New Museum challenges the antiseptic aim of curation and conservation by imagining a different kind of organic art that needs to be nurtured rather than preserved.

  • Ongoing

    Dia’s recent acquisition of works by Charles Gaines forms the basis of this survey, which includes the artist’s first forays into mathematics-based grid drawings and other early experiments in medium and form.

  • Ongoing

    Day’s End, an elegiac memorial to and stubborn ghost of eras bygone, will also serve as silent witness to the inevitable changes to come.

  • Through
    Jan 2nd 2023

    The sonic encounters provoked by Camille Norment’s elaborate acoustic artworks serve as agents for social consciousness.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The words masterful and mastery assert themselves the instant one encounters the works in “My Body,” both for Nancy Grossman’s command of a wide range of skills and her active state of dominance, identity and selfhood.