Plus One

Luhring Augustine
531 W 24th Street
New York
Chelsea
Jun 23rd 2021 — Aug 7th 2021

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For "Plus One," Luhring Augustine invited nine of its artists to exhibit a single work, and asked each to pick another artist they admire who would also have one work included in the show. Textile artist and painter Christina Forrer chose sculptor Evan Holloway, for example, while Ragnar Kjartansson nominated fellow Icelander Ingibjörg Sigurjónsdóttir. In this manner, “Plus One” honors the importance of community in an art practice, and serves as a welcome celebration of friendship after a year of isolation.

For his plus one, Salman Toor selected fellow painter Doron Langberg; the two are exhibiting portraits of one another, each carried out in their respective and recognizable styles. Elsewhere, Janine Antoni shows her milky white resin sculpture to return (2015) [pictured], in which a hand cradles a sacrum—the human bone at the end of our spine that would have connected us to our tails had we not evolved out of them. Antoni’s invitee, Guadalupe Maravilla, exhibits Ancestral Stomach 1 (2021), part of her sculptural series that explores the ways in which genetic trauma is carried across generations.

"Plus One" allows us to consider the ways in which the 18 exhibited artists create intentional dialogues across the contemporary and historical landscape. In this manner, these artists are looking to their colleagues of the present while also honoring the vast archive of personal and societal memories and associations that we all carry with us. The show serves as a reminder that friendship and community are sacred things—and may in fact be our most important legacies. —Wallace Ludel

Janine Antoni, to return, 2015. Polyurethane resin, 37 x 17 x 17 inches. © Janine Antoni; Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    A traveling exhibition of 69 oil paintings, watercolors and works on paper aims to chart Milton Avery’s trajectory and contextualize his work for a new generation.

  • Through
    May 29th

    Inspired by fractals, Renee Cox’s deity-like collages of Black figures constitute an Afrofuturist creation myth.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    An economical survey of Jonas Mekas, “The Camera Was Always Running” serves as a touching introduction to the Lithuanian filmmaker and champion of avant-garde cinema.

  • Through
    May 22nd

    Exhibited with melodic sight-lines, Mary Manning’s “Ambient Music” hums with the background noise of the subconscious.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The words masterful and mastery assert themselves the instant one encounters the works in “My Body,” both for Nancy Grossman’s command of a wide range of skills and her active state of dominance, identity and selfhood.

  • Through
    May 23rd

    Full of whimsy and delight, Fernanda Laguna’s work in “The Path of the Heart” cuts an incisive critique of sociopolitical issues in Latin America.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The work in Valentina Vaccarella’s “Bless this Life” rests on a simple irony: monogrammed, embroidered French bridal linens pulled taut across stretcher bars and besmirched by rough images of modern madams.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    Daniel Lie’s “Unnamed Entities” at the New Museum challenges the antiseptic aim of curation and conservation by imagining a different kind of organic art that needs to be nurtured rather than preserved.

  • Through
    Jan 2nd 2023

    The sonic encounters provoked by Camille Norment’s elaborate acoustic artworks serve as agents for social consciousness.

  • Ongoing

    Day’s End, an elegiac memorial to and stubborn ghost of eras bygone, will also serve as silent witness to the inevitable changes to come.

  • Ongoing

    Dia’s recent acquisition of works by Charles Gaines forms the basis of this survey, which includes the artist’s first forays into mathematics-based grid drawings and other early experiments in medium and form.