XX

LatchKey Gallery
323 Canal Street
New York
Soho
Mar 23rd 2021 — May 2nd 2021

Find out more

The titular “x” of “XX,” a group show at Latchkey Gallery, refers to the double-x chromosome to those assigned female at birth, but also unsettles that easy formulation—referring as well to the gender-neutral “x” of “Latinx.” “The six artists in this exhibition strikingly use shape, color and materials to create bold, new worlds where abstraction dismantles ordered thought,” Natalie Kates, co-founder of Latchkey, says. Amanda L. Uribe, the other co-founder, adds: “Our hope is to create ongoing opportunities while building sustainable careers for female artists so they are included in the canon of contemporary art history."

The works on view are graphic and vested in color interactions. Beverly Acha contributes a pair of paintings, one of which contains wavering bright cobalt and dusty rose lines, recalling an ocean horizon at dusk, tilted on axes. Meanwhile, Marisol Martinez’s two paintings, installed on either side of a doorway, depict floating pastel shapes superimposed over a black background. A number of works riff off of or otherwise undermine the Modernist grid. Take C. J. Chueca’s wall-mounted sculpture: though gridded, it’s made up of crumbling pink-and-tan shower tiles; Edra Soto’s “GRAFT” series, having been made as a site-specific installation for this exhibition, takes shape as, for instance, a lattice dotted with x’s and o’s like a tic-tac-toe board, which mediates the view into photographs of the artist’s home after Hurricane Maria. Ivellise Jiménez and Victoria Martinez’s sculptural works similarly play with transparency and opacity while centering viewer interactions, the latter showing a doorway, made with a combination of found textiles and hand-drawn lines and lettering. “Te quiero contar un sueño,” it reads, confidingly: “I want to tell you a dream.”



Marisol Martinez, The Space Between Us #2, 2021. Acrylic on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and LatchKey Gallery.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    A traveling exhibition of 69 oil paintings, watercolors and works on paper aims to chart Milton Avery’s trajectory and contextualize his work for a new generation.

  • Through
    May 29th

    Inspired by fractals, Renee Cox’s deity-like collages of Black figures constitute an Afrofuturist creation myth.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    An economical survey of Jonas Mekas, “The Camera Was Always Running” serves as a touching introduction to the Lithuanian filmmaker and champion of avant-garde cinema.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The work in Valentina Vaccarella’s “Bless this Life” rests on a simple irony: monogrammed, embroidered French bridal linens pulled taut across stretcher bars and besmirched by rough images of modern madams.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    Daniel Lie’s “Unnamed Entities” at the New Museum challenges the antiseptic aim of curation and conservation by imagining a different kind of organic art that needs to be nurtured rather than preserved.

  • Ongoing

    Dia’s recent acquisition of works by Charles Gaines forms the basis of this survey, which includes the artist’s first forays into mathematics-based grid drawings and other early experiments in medium and form.

  • Ongoing

    Day’s End, an elegiac memorial to and stubborn ghost of eras bygone, will also serve as silent witness to the inevitable changes to come.

  • Through
    Jan 2nd 2023

    The sonic encounters provoked by Camille Norment’s elaborate acoustic artworks serve as agents for social consciousness.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The words masterful and mastery assert themselves the instant one encounters the works in “My Body,” both for Nancy Grossman’s command of a wide range of skills and her active state of dominance, identity and selfhood.