3.0

Chapter NY
60 Walker Street
New York
Tribeca
Sep 10th 2021 — Oct 16th 2021

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Since opening in 2013, Chapter NY—with Nicole Russo, formerly of Mitchell Innes & Nash and Leo Koenig Inc., at its helm—has steadily cemented a sterling reputation as a small but influential downtown art gallery, first opening on Henry Street before moving to a roomier Houston Street location in 2016. Now, “3.0” inaugurates Chapter NY’s third space, on Walker Street. The group show features new works from all 15 artists on the gallery’s roster—heralding Chapter NY’s arrival in Tribeca while paying homage to its Lower East Side beginnings.

Stella Zhong contributes a monumental, epoxy resin-and-clay sculpture titled Every Other Chopped (2021). A muted green-grey, the nonfunctional structure resembles an oval table top sitting on cartoonishly tall legs, its smooth, geometric components lending the piece a midcentury-modern sensibility. Meanwhile, the comparatively diminutive, cast-resin Pink Elephant (2021) by Sam Anderson consists of two, petal-like pink discs standing upright on a pedestal, affixed by a strange, engorged mass.

More than anything, “3.0” reflects Chapter NY’s history of  staging succinct yet impactful shows that prepare emerging artists for entry into prestigious collections and institutions. Some notable cases in point: Dalton Gata, who joined the gallery in 2019, currently has a solo presentation at ICA Miami; plus, Anne Greene Kelly and Erin Jane Nelson—who’ve been with Chapter NY since 2017 and 2020, respectively—both made the cut for this year’s New Museum Triennial. — Rachel Small

Erin Jane Nelson, Watering Problem, 2021. Pigmented inkjet prints, glass, glazed stoneware, brass, invasive seed pods, silicone, and bio-based resin on glazed stoneware, 46 ½ × 29 ½ × 5 inches.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    A traveling exhibition of 69 oil paintings, watercolors and works on paper aims to chart Milton Avery’s trajectory and contextualize his work for a new generation.

  • Through
    May 29th

    Inspired by fractals, Renee Cox’s deity-like collages of Black figures constitute an Afrofuturist creation myth.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    An economical survey of Jonas Mekas, “The Camera Was Always Running” serves as a touching introduction to the Lithuanian filmmaker and champion of avant-garde cinema.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The work in Valentina Vaccarella’s “Bless this Life” rests on a simple irony: monogrammed, embroidered French bridal linens pulled taut across stretcher bars and besmirched by rough images of modern madams.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    Daniel Lie’s “Unnamed Entities” at the New Museum challenges the antiseptic aim of curation and conservation by imagining a different kind of organic art that needs to be nurtured rather than preserved.

  • Ongoing

    Dia’s recent acquisition of works by Charles Gaines forms the basis of this survey, which includes the artist’s first forays into mathematics-based grid drawings and other early experiments in medium and form.

  • Ongoing

    Day’s End, an elegiac memorial to and stubborn ghost of eras bygone, will also serve as silent witness to the inevitable changes to come.

  • Through
    Jan 2nd 2023

    The sonic encounters provoked by Camille Norment’s elaborate acoustic artworks serve as agents for social consciousness.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The words masterful and mastery assert themselves the instant one encounters the works in “My Body,” both for Nancy Grossman’s command of a wide range of skills and her active state of dominance, identity and selfhood.