Devastation

Queer Thoughts
373 Broadway, B3
Second Floor, Dial 203
New York
Tribeca
Dec 7th 2021 — Jan 29th 2022

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Inaugurating the gallery Queer Thoughts’s new space, the group show “Devastation” contains works by eight artists that share a color scheme of leached blues, grey and bright red, as well as a sense of quiet, unindignant devastation.

David Rappeneau’s drawings are reminiscent of anime and tattoos. Drawn in thick, clean lines with ballpoint pen, charcoal pencil and acrylic marker, they depict a crucifix-wearing, chain-bearing man. Electrodes connect his skull to a magenta monkey-like animal, and he  weeps in a blue-saturated, antiseptic environment as two figures threaten with syringes. Thomas Eggerer paints shoe soles as rugged biomechanical planes, while a white square at the center of his work suggests salvation along with the hard impact of a boot. Chelsea Culprit loops back to the pre-Freudian in Oneieocritica (2021), a reference to an ancient Greek treatise that translates roughly to “The Interpretation of Dreams.” In her painting, indigo wash serves as backdrop to a red contour drawing of a long-lashed bunny who wears a stiletto heel and proffers a human-like claw.

Dean Sameshima’s quietly devastating pair of photographs from 1998 are both entitled In Between Days (Without You). One is a red-soaked image of an empty, unrumpled bed propped with a pillow—nobody has slept here in some time, and might never again. Cryptic and oddly moving, Ren Light Pan’s shadowy sleep painting (11.1.2021) just barely teases the figure of a woman crouched, as if poised to take flight, and contains the line: “sumi ink, body heat, transgirl on canvas.” This show is not a rallying cry—rather, a depiction or submission to soundless desolation. —Lisa Yin Zhang

Chelsea Culprit, Oneieocritica, 2021. Acrylic, oil, and crayon on canvas, 65 x 63 inches.

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    A traveling exhibition of 69 oil paintings, watercolors and works on paper aims to chart Milton Avery’s trajectory and contextualize his work for a new generation.

  • Through
    May 29th

    Inspired by fractals, Renee Cox’s deity-like collages of Black figures constitute an Afrofuturist creation myth.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    An economical survey of Jonas Mekas, “The Camera Was Always Running” serves as a touching introduction to the Lithuanian filmmaker and champion of avant-garde cinema.

  • Through
    May 22nd

    Exhibited with melodic sight-lines, Mary Manning’s “Ambient Music” hums with the background noise of the subconscious.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The words masterful and mastery assert themselves the instant one encounters the works in “My Body,” both for Nancy Grossman’s command of a wide range of skills and her active state of dominance, identity and selfhood.

  • Through
    May 23rd

    Full of whimsy and delight, Fernanda Laguna’s work in “The Path of the Heart” cuts an incisive critique of sociopolitical issues in Latin America.

  • Through
    May 28th

    The work in Valentina Vaccarella’s “Bless this Life” rests on a simple irony: monogrammed, embroidered French bridal linens pulled taut across stretcher bars and besmirched by rough images of modern madams.

  • Through
    Jun 6th

    Daniel Lie’s “Unnamed Entities” at the New Museum challenges the antiseptic aim of curation and conservation by imagining a different kind of organic art that needs to be nurtured rather than preserved.

  • Through
    Jan 2nd 2023

    The sonic encounters provoked by Camille Norment’s elaborate acoustic artworks serve as agents for social consciousness.

  • Ongoing

    Day’s End, an elegiac memorial to and stubborn ghost of eras bygone, will also serve as silent witness to the inevitable changes to come.

  • Ongoing

    Dia’s recent acquisition of works by Charles Gaines forms the basis of this survey, which includes the artist’s first forays into mathematics-based grid drawings and other early experiments in medium and form.