TITAN

Outdoor Exhibition in a Series of Phone Booths

kurimanzutto
22 E 65th Street, Floor 4
Offsite | between W 51st & W 56th Streets on 6th Avenue, Midtown Manhattan.
New York
Upper East Side
Oct 12th 2020 — Jan 3rd 2021

Find out more | Map of works | Participating artists

kurimanzutto has launched billboards in Mexico City, performances in local markets, and exhibitions in floating gardens—now, it takes as its gallery space a dozen near-defunct Manhattan phone booths. “TITAN”—the name, apparently, of the advertisement agency whose name plasters phone booths across the city—also fittingly recalls the pre-Olympian gods whose fall led to a new world order, as well as the phrase “Titans of Industry,” a loaded phrase in a time of massive inequality. “TITAN,” conceived of and organized by Damián Ortega and Bree Zucker, coincides with an end of an era: the last weeks before the phone booths are removed by the city, as well as the American presidential election. Over a span of twelve weeks, twelve phone booths will each be taken over by one of an all star cast of artists: Anne Collier, Cildo Meireles, Glenn Ligon, Hal Fischer, Hans Haacke, Jimmie Durham, Minerva Cuevas, Patti Smith, Renée Green, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Yvonne Rainer, and Zoe Leonard.

“YOU DON’T HATE MONDAYS,” chided Minerva Cuevas’s contribution, from the side of a phone booth on the corner of 56th St. A work by Rirkrit Tiravanija proclaimed, “FEBREZE FOR FASCISM.” A number of the works explicitly cite the election: another side of Tiravanija’s work reads “REMEMBER IN NOVEMBER,” and Glenn Ligon contributes a pair of pictures of neon works, one side of a booth reading “November 3, 2020,” and the other “November 4, 2020.”



Installation view of Glenn Ligon, Aftermath, 2020.

For TITAN, New York City, October 12, 2020 – January 3, 2021 Image courtesy of the artist, kurimanzutto, Mexico City / New York; Hauser & Wirth, New York; Regen Projects, Los Angeles; Thomas Dane Gallery, London; and Chantal Crousel, Paris Photo: PJ Rountree

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